More Post-Apocalyptic Worry Abounds in THE YEAR OF THE FLOOD

yearofthefloodThe second installment in the MaddAddam trilogy, The Year of the Flood, runs parallel with the events of Oryx and Crake. The novel follows young Ren and aging Toby as they struggle in the post-apocalyptic society, looking for other survivors. Just as in the first novel, their pasts are revealed through extensive flashbacks, giving us a broader view of the world outside the Healthwyzer compound (which we saw a lot of in Oryx and Crake).
The first novel dealt a mostly with science and Crake’s motivation for creating a “perfect” species. Flood deals with the religious aspects of the world. Both Ren and Toby spend time with the God’s Gardeners cult, the fanatics behind the creation of MaddAddam. Both women’s live crossover into Jimmy’s narrative, popping up at recognizable moments from Oryx and Crake. Ren, especially, is so interwoven into Jimmy’s life you almost feel the urge to reread his account. But as the novel reaches its thrilling conclusion, catching up with Jimmy’s final moments from before, you’ll feel an even more pressing urge to jump into MaddAddam.
Atwood’s skilled writing is further exemplified in this novel. She incorporates her poetry background into the hymns that the Gardeners sing. She also intriguingly jumps between first person for Ren’s story and third person for Toby’s. Her world building for this trilogy is astounding, and Flood will continue to put you on edge with the frightening prescience of the culture and events in the novel.

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3 Comments

  1. sylviemarieheroux

     /  November 13, 2013

    I loved this book (as I loved all three in the trilogy and all of Margaret Atwood too!). I just loved diving into this twisted universe Atwood created and imagining all the implications of the scientific developments that are referred to. I just couldn’t wait to read Madd Addam when it came out this fall. There will be hours in fun in rereading the whole series.

    Reply
  1. You Won’t Be MADD When You Read Atwood’s Final MADDADDAM Novel | The JK Review
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